Eagle Scout Service Project Focuses on Gwinnett Tech Landscape

January 03, 2013

Eagle Scout Service Project Focuses on Gwinnett Tech Landscape
Scientists and environmentalists studying ways to minimize the heat island effect might want to consult Eagle Scout Brian Dalyrmple about the strategies he implemented on the Gwinnett Tech campus.

Lawrenceville

Scientists and environmentalists studying ways to minimize the heat island effect might want to consult Eagle Scout Brian Dalyrmple about the strategies he implemented on the Gwinnett Tech campus.

Brian, a member of BSA Troop 1534 from Buford and a junior at Mill Creek High School, earned the rank of Eagle Scout last month, developing and implementing a landscaping project designed to minimize the heat island effect on the GTC grounds.

Brian's project was no small task. By the numbers, it involved 21 trees. 1,400 plants, 100 bales of pine straw and 194 hours of volunteer labor from Brian, fellow troop members and the Gwinnett Tech grounds staff.

Heat islands occur when buildings, roads and other infrastructure items replace open land and vegetation, forming an "island" of higher temperatures in the landscape. The result? Increased energy costs, compromised human comfort and even increased air pollution.

Gwinnett Tech's leadership and grounds staff have long been focused on protecting the campus's urban forest, maintaining and improving the grounds using the latest techniques in environmental horticulture, sustainability, xeriscaping, soil management and energy-efficient landscape design. Gwinnett Tech has earned and maintained the designation of a Tree Campus USA from the Arbor Day Foundation for many years.

So, when Brian took his ideas to Gwinnett Tech's Gail Zorn, the college's grounds manager, he found both an expert and kindred spirit to help with his Eagle Service Project. Brian and his team devoted three weeks in the spring planting season to the project, which will reduce the heat island effect, conserve water and control soil erosion.

In December, a panel of four Eagle Scouts ranging from 75 to 49 years old agreed that Brian had fulfilled the requirements to become an Eagle Scout. Less than 10 percent of Boy Scouts earn the Eagle Scout rank.

Brian is the son of Allen and Donna Dalrymple. Allen is the program director of Gwinnett Tech's Emergency Services Education program.

GTC offers more than 45 degree, diploma and certificate student options that students can finish in two years or less. For more information, visit www.GwinnettTech.edu or call 770-962-7580.

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